HOSPITALITY TECHNOLOGY COMPANY EXPANDS TO PALM BEACH COUNTY, CREATES JOBS

Buyers Edge Platform, a technology-based group purchasing organization for the restaurant industry, has established new offices in Lake Worth.

The Waltham, Massachusetts recently moved 45 employees to the EcoCentre corporate office at 1005 Lake Ave., where it invested $7 million. Buyers Edge plans to create another 20 jobs there.

“Their commitment is confirmation that Palm Beach County offers a competitive business location to growing technology companies and we are appreciative of their investment in our economy,” said Kelly Smallridge,

president and CEO of the Business Development Board (BDB) in an announcement.

Buyers Edge is currently seeking to fill multiple positions at its Lake Worth office. On its website, it has job postings for a business development manager, executive assistant, marketing program manager, program development manager, program director and sales development representatives. CEO John Davie on March 1 purchased the EcoCentre building where the company will expand its South Florida operations.

“Florida’s concentration of restaurants, lodging properties, gaming facilities and other foodservice establishments makes it one of the most vital foodservice markets in the nation,” Davie said. “It’s the perfect location for Buyers Edge Platform to develop a ‘hub’ market, which is why we are investing in personnel, partnerships and even real estate in the state.”

Buyers Edge’s network encompasses 45,000 restaurant and food service locations with $7 billion in member purchasing power.

The BDB is targeting companies in technology, among other industries with high-paying, high-skilled jobs, in its efforts to bring more corporate expansions and relocations to Palm Beach County.South Florida Business Journal By Emon Reiser
 – Digital Producerhttps://www.bizjournals.com/southflorida/news/2019/04/23/buyers-edge-platform-expands-to-lake-worth.html


LIFE-METRICS MOBILE APP WINS FAU’S BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION

Life-Metrics, an activity tracking mobile app, won first place and $10,000 in prize money at the annual Florida Atlantic University Business Plan Competition, recently hosted by FAU’s Adams Center for Entrepreneurship and the College of Business at the FAU Office Depot Center on the Boca Raton campus.   

Created by Wilkes Honors College student David Gorski, the Life-Metrics app platform establishes quantitative connections between health/usage data and psychological/physical well-being. By bringing together a wealth of data already available with cutting-edge machine learning, Life-Metrics aims to “create a world in which we all know precisely how our habits affect our lives.” Earlier this year, Gorski won $2,500 for his venture as one of the winners of the Kenan Social Engagement Program Scholarship.

“It feels great knowing that people believe in my vision,” Gorski said. “A lot of the work of an entrepreneur is long nights without much direct reward so it’s great to see people, especially other professionals and entrepreneurs, respond so positively to your work. There were a lot of great businesses and presenters at the Business Plan Competition, so to win is a great honor.”

Second prize and $5,000 went to Daisy, a nonprofit organization that aims to facilitate the donation of feminine hygiene products to homeless and at-risk women by selling “period kits” to shelters or homeless resource centers. Daisy’s founder, Amanda Barstow, is also a Wilkes Honors College student and winner of a 2019 Kenan Social Engagement Program Scholarship that provided a $10,000 seed grant for her venture. By participating in the Business Plan Competition, Barstow said she was able to grow both personally and grow her vision for Daisy.

“I was also able to effectively workshop my business plan through suggestions made by various judges,” she said. “There wasn’t one pitch where I didn’t receive useful feedback or an interesting idea to implement. All of this experience would have been reward enough for me but I also ended up with additional seed funding, which will make it possible for me to really get my idea off the ground.”

NERD, an autonomous robotic delivery service specializing in food and snack delivery on college campuses, took third place and $2,500. Using autonomous robots, NERD, which stands for NEarby Robotic Delivery, solves the last-mile delivery problem and helps increase staff and student productivity throughout the day. 

“The biggest thing we gained out of this competition was experience,” said Alexander Roscoe, developer of NERD. “Being engineers, the whole process was a learning process. We were able to make valuable connections as well as gain exposure for our company.” 

The People’s Choice winner of a $1,000 prize was MILÁMU, which aims to help eliminate skin deficiencies and enhance natural beauty by crafting 100 percent natural essential oil blends. The company also offers a line of bracelets and accessories made from semi-precious stones and pearls. To positively affect the community, MILÁMU partners with a different philanthropic organization and donates up to 20 percent of purchases to the cause.

SBA Communications and Paradise Bank were the event’s sponsors.

-FAU-


PHARMACEUTICAL LOGISTICS DISCUSSED AT LIFE SCIENCE PROGRAM FEATURING WDSrx PRESIDENT ADAM RUNSDORF

News and Presspharma logisticsPharmaceutical distributionpharmaceutical warehouseApril 19, 2019Guy Fronstin, Esq (second from left), BDB Board Member Gary Lesser, Esq., WDSrx President Adam Runsdorf, 
BioFlorida President Nancy Bryan and BioFlorida Operations Manager Tara-Ann Coleman at the Life Science program 
at Kravis Center in West Palm Beach, FL April 18, 2019

West Palm Beach, FL (April 18, 2019) – Healthcare is a topical discussion issue and the Business Development Board of Palm Beach County focused on the growing life sciences industry during their quarterly Economic Development luncheon that took place at the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach, Florida.

A prominent group of 150 guests listened as three experts in healthcare finance and operations spoke about the emerging life sciences market in Florida and the Palm Beach County-based companies ready to serve their specialized business requirements.

Alan Wink, Director of Capital Markets at EisnerAmper, an accounting, advisory and tax services firm, outlined methods for pharmaceutical manufacturers to acquire investment capital.  Wink also provided an overview of venture capital deal activity in Florida and economic trends that demonstrate growing awareness among the investing community for Florida-based healthcare businesses.

Life science companies with the necessary financial structure and management may decide to seek capital from public markets including the New York Stock Exchange or the NASDAQ, according to R. Doug Armstrong, co-owner of Dawson James Securities.  Although predominantly recognized for generating large amounts of investment funds, public exchanges may be the answer for smaller capitalization levels in certain situations, according to Armstrong, who provided case studies of Florida companies that achieved funding goals utilizing this strategy.

WDSrx President Adam Runsdorf began his remarks by reviewing the origin of the company in Boca Raton, Florida.  The pharmaceutical logistics services provider began operations in 2010 with two employees and one client in a single warehouse that occupied part of a larger building.  Today, over 200 employees serve clients in seven pharmaceutical warehouse facilities located in Florida, Ohio, New Jersey and Texas.

Runsdorf also discussed how newly-commercialized pharmaceutical manufacturers and virtual manufacturers achieve efficiencies and increase productivity by outsourcing supply chain management to WDSrx or another reputable logistics services provider.

Seated at the WDSrx table were prominent life sciences professionals and community business leaders including BDB Board Member Gary Lesser, Esq., of Lesser, Lesser, Landy and Smith PLLC; Bart Bishop, Senior Vice-President at Fifth Third Bank; Guy Fronstin, Esq. of the Law Offices of Guy Fronstin, P.A.; Michael Feuerman, Esq., Senior Vice President of Berger Commercial Realty; Nancy Bryan, President and CEO of BioFlorida; Stacey Silver, BioFlorida Vice President of Marketing and Membership; Mark Eidemueller and Blake Miller of Wasena Capital Management, Inc.; and Neil Weiss, Managing Partner of Coastal Wealth, a member of the MassMutual Financial Group.

For further information contact Larry Hotz, [email protected] and 561-295-8254 x304.

WDSrx President Adam Runsdorf informed 150 guests at the Kravis Center about the unique role the company plays within the pharmaceutical supply chain.


Boynton Beach Offering $50K to New Business Incubators and Research Groups

Boynton Beach is offering $50,000 in grants to organizations and research groups that help new businesses.

The city’s Department of Economic Development and Strategy has launched an entrepreneurship and business incubation grant program, according to a news release. A total of $50,000 will be distributed to qualified working groups and business incubators located within the corporate limits of Boynton Beach.

According to the city, a working group is defined as a research group or informal think tank.

The available grants are as follows:

  • Two $20,000 grants will be awarded; one to an existing business incubator and one to an entrepreneur for the establishment of a new business incubator.
  • Three $2,500 grants will be provided; one to a working group on entrepreneurship for women, one to a working group on entrepreneurship for youth, and one to a working group on entrepreneurship for technology.
  • In addition, one $2,500 grant will be awarded to a working group on regional networks for entrepreneurship.

All grant recipients will be required to produce a final report on their findings. The city will utilize the reports to develop programs and initiatives to support entrepreneurship, with the end result of increasing the local business climate and building wealth in the community.

The application deadline is May 3. Grants recipients will be announced at the end of May. Applications and guidelines are available at Boynton-Beach.org/Grants.

Call 561-742-6014 or email [email protected].


GEORGE GENTILE THRIVES ON HELPING PEOPLE ENJOY NATURE

When George Gentile was growing up in Riviera Beach, he fished in the canals west of Jupiter.

“I remember my father telling me when I first got my driver’s license, ‘If you go past Northlake Boulevard, I consider that going out of the state of Florida,’” said Gentile, who has lived in the Jupiter area since 1980.

Gentile founded landscape architecture and planning firm Gentile Glas Holloway O’Mahoney & Associates in 1988. He is also chairman of the Palm Beach North Chamber of Commerce, president of the Marine Industries Association of Palm Beach County, and chairman and commissioner of the Jupiter Inlet District.

Gentile attended Riviera Beach Elementary and Howell Watkins Jr. High and was in the first graduating class of Suncoast High School in Riviera Beach.

After graduating from the University of Florida in 1977, he began working with various cities, including Jupiter, to develop their first comprehensive plans.

When they were starting out, he and his wife, Jeanette, first lived in West Palm Beach, then bought a starter home in Jupiter. Then, 29 years ago, they moved to 6 acres west of Riverbend Park on the north side of Indiantown Road where they have two horses and two dogs. They also enjoy boating and fishing.

“It gave us an opportunity to get into an area and thrive and grow,” Gentile said. “I love Jupiter because of the access to the beach and the water. The quality of life up here is great, the entire north end of the county. Our roots are here.”

Name: George G. Gentile

Age: 65

Hometown and where you live now: Born in Meriden, Conn. Moved to Florida with my family in 1956; I now live west of Jupiter in unincorporated Palm Beach County.

Family: Married 45 years to my wife, Jeanette; we have three sons, four grandchildren and one grandchild on the way. All live in northern Palm Beach County

Education: Received associate of arts degree from Palm Beach Junior College (now Palm Beach State College) in 1973, and a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree from the University of Florida in 1977.

Career: I started working for a landscape architect part time in 1971 drafting plans for his designs throughout Palm Beach County. I later went to work, before attending the University of Florida, with an engineering firm. Upon completion of my degree from the University of Florida, I obtained my first professional position as a planner for Palm Beach County. In 1978, I became the assistant planning director of the city of Vero Beach, and Indian River County’s first environmental administrator. In 1982 I started an architectural firm called GBS Architects, Landscape Architects, Planners Inc. in Jupiter. In 1988 I started the firm I am still managing as president and senior partner.

About your company: Gentile Glas Holloway O’Mahoney & Associates (2GHO is our brand) was founded in 1988 and was originally George G. Gentile & Associates. Since establishment, 2GHO has provided professional landscape architecture, land planning, permitting and environmental consulting and permitting for both private and public clients alike. We have 12 highly professional and motivated staff members on our team at 2GHO. Our team includes licensed landscape architects and professional planners recognized by the American Institute of Certified Planners.

We have had the honor of working on all types of projects since our inception in 1988 including the restoration Palm Beach County’s Dyer Landfill and site planning the first Resource Recovery Facility built in the 1990s. We were overall landscape architects for Abacoa and completed the plans and design of the county’s first traditional neighborhood “New Haven” in Abacoa. Other projects include Jupiter Country Club and Sonoma Isles — both residential neighborhoods; Harbourside Place and landscape architectural design at Fitteam Ballpark of the Palm Beaches, the home of the Washington Nationals and Houston Astros. 2GHO just completed an eight-block master plan for the old downtown area of Reno, Nevada.

First paying job and what you learned from it: My first paying job was with a garden center located in Riviera Beach and owned by William Steinman. I learned how to take care of your staff, equipment and your customers.

First break in business: I was engaged by Sam Barker and Associates, PE and the Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County to design an End-Use plan for the Dyer Landfill. The plan included closure of the landfill, creation of the three eco-islands, a sports park and both a golf driving range and model airplane flying facility. This project, led to the overall restoration of the landfill site, planning and site development design of Palm Beach County’s first Resource Recovery Facility and a national award from the American Society of Landscape Architects.

How your business has changed: As technology changes so has our business. We used to hand-draw everything and the accuracy was really not there. The use of computer-aided design and drafting to video imaging gives our clients a real vision of their projects and helps us create more desirable and usable spaces. We can also make changes and present our thoughts faster and more cost-effectively.

Best business book that you have read: “In Search of Excellence” by Tom Peters. He described the management style of John Chambers, CEO of Cisco Systems. I was intrigued by his method of “managing while walking around.” He engaged with all his employees continually throughout the day, working together on issues and encouraging his employee’s creativity. I have used this in my business and found it to be the most effective way to manage, keep on top of issues and the employees feel that we are all team, working together for a better result for our clients. We have very little turnover and our office is an enjoyable place to work.

Best piece of business advice you have received: Treat your employees as if they are the product you are selling. If they feel good about their job and the company they work for, they will sell your services to the clients and your business with thrive. We take care of our employees as if they were family and they are.

What you tell young people about your business: Landscape architecture is one of the most diverse and rewarding professions, creating sustainable environments and spaces that people and nature can enjoy and thrive in together.

What do you see ahead for Palm Beach County? Palm Beach County will continue to be one of the most robust economies in the country. The collaboration of all its business organizations, businesses and government entities is the basis of creating the best place to live, work and play throughout the United States.

Power lunch spot: With my staff in the office or at La Masseria in the PGA Commons off PGA Boulevard.

First break in business: I was engaged by Sam Barker and Associates, PE and the Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County to design an End-Use plan for the Dyer Landfill. The plan included closure of the landfill, creation of the three eco-islands, a sports park and both a golf driving range and model airplane flying facility. This project, led to the overall restoration of the landfill site, planning and site development design of Palm Beach County’s first Resource Recovery Facility and a national award from the American Society of Landscape Architects.

How your business has changed: As technology changes so has our business. We used to hand-draw everything and the accuracy was really not there. The use of computer-aided design and drafting to video imaging gives our clients a real vision of their projects and helps us create more desirable and usable spaces. We can also make changes and present our thoughts faster and more cost-effectively.

Best business book that you have read: “In Search of Excellence” by Tom Peters. He described the management style of John Chambers, CEO of Cisco Systems. I was intrigued by his method of “managing while walking around.” He engaged with all his employees continually throughout the day, working together on issues and encouraging his employee’s creativity. I have used this in my business and found it to be the most effective way to manage, keep on top of issues and the employees feel that we are all team, working together for a better result for our clients. We have very little turnover and our office is an enjoyable place to work.

Best piece of business advice you have received: Treat your employees as if they are the product you are selling. If they feel good about their job and the company they work for, they will sell your services to the clients and your business with thrive. We take care of our employees as if they were family and they are.

What you tell young people about your business: Landscape architecture is one of the most diverse and rewarding professions, creating sustainable environments and spaces that people and nature can enjoy and thrive in together.

What do you see ahead for Palm Beach County? Palm Beach County will continue to be one of the most robust economies in the country. The collaboration of all its business organizations, businesses and government entities is the basis of creating the best place to live, work and play throughout the United States.

Power lunch spot: With my staff in the office or at La Masseria in the PGA Commons off PGA Boulevard.

SOURCE:
https://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/20190410/george-gentile-thrives-on-helping-people-enjoy-nature


PBA CELEBRATES 50TH ANNIVERSARY AT FOUNDERS DAY

Three past presidents reflected on fifty years of faithfulness that enabled Palm Beach Atlantic University to grow from a small, struggling college into the comprehensive, Christian university it is today.

From left: Patrick Moody, son of founding President Jess Moody; Dr. George Borders; Claude H. Rhea III, Dr. Paul R. Corts, Dr. David Clark and President William M. B. Fleming, Jr. pose for a photo at the 50th Anniversary Founders Day celebration.

The presidents – Dr. George Borders, Dr. Paul R. Corts and Dr. David Clark – shared their reflections during the annual Founders Day celebration Wednesday morning. Students, faculty, staff, trustees and friends of the university filled the Rubin Arena for the formal ceremony in the Greene Complex. 

Patrick Moody ’76, son of founding President Dr. Jess Moody, said the opening prayer, and Claude H. Rhea III, the son of former President Dr. Claude H. Rhea, Jr., gave the benediction. The Concert Choir performed “The Steadfast Love of the Lord,” a piece Dr. Tim Thompson wrote for the occasion.

Current President William M. B. Fleming, Jr. presided. He encouraged students to treat the worship service as a personal rededication and to “dream with God at the helm” of their hearts.

Borders, who led PBA as it grew out of infancy, said when he arrived in 1978, the university had fewer than 600 students and lost more students than it was accepting each year. The students who stayed could have gone to any school in the country, but they chose PBA.

“Those students were great. They were the true pioneers throughout the ’70s and the early ’80s,” Borders said.

He listed off the supporters who kept the university going in the early years: Riley Sims, Marshall E. “Doc” Rinker, Sr., William G. Lassiter, for whom the student center at the center of campus is named.

Borders told Lassiter they needed to build the center to send a message to then-West Palm Beach Mayor Helen Wilkes and the city commission that PBA was here to stay. Before that, city officials told him, “We’re not so sure.”

He ended with advice from Vince Lombardi about what it takes to win: Do things right all the time, not just once in a while, and play with all your heart.

“For 50 years, students, teachers…you and your predecessors have worked your hearts out for the cause of Jesus Christ and for the cause of Palm Beach Atlantic, and we owe you a debt of gratitude,” Borders said.

Corts, who oversaw PBA during a decade of unprecedented growth from 1991 to 2002, recalled the decade of monumental change that followed the university’s creation in 1968.

Students, faculty, staff, trustees and friends of the university filled the Rubin Arena for the Founders Day ceremony in the Greene Complex.

Alluding to the “Dream!” theme for the year, Corts quoted John F. Kennedy’s inaugural address and Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech as he remembered the elder Moody, a “dynamic, young Baptist pastor who was sensitive to the spirit of God.”

“In this room, young people dream new dreams. Keep the dream as we commit to follow Christ,” Corts said.

Clark, who served as president from 2003 to 2009, reflected on how the elder Moody dreamed an impossible dream – to start a college. God has been making the improbable come to pass ever since.

More than a decade ago, it seemed improbable, if not impossible, that university leaders would be able to fulfill a dream they had to build an athletic campus on 76 acres of land just north of Southern Boulevard, Clark said.

Donald Trump planned to build a golf course on it. The county owned the land, and the price was steep. The golf course plans fell through, and the university was able to buy the property at a lower price per acre than anticipated. Today, it is home to the Marshall and Vera Lea Rinker Athletic Campus.

“God specializes in things thought improbable, impossible,” Clark said. “This little college was improbable, but God has used it in a marvelous way.

Clark continued: “The future is bright. Why? Because the future is as bright as the promises of God. He will do improbable things in your lives, too, students.”


PHI BETA LAMBDA STUDENTS WIN STATE AWARDS

Three Palm Beach State College students will compete on the national level after winning top awards at the Phi Beta Lambda state competition.

Adrian Stephenson won first place in the Help Desk category, Thomas DeVito was awarded second place in the Justice Administration category and Magdala St. Fleur took home third in Client Relations during the event held in Orlando March 28-31.

Hundreds of students from colleges and universities, including 14 from PBSC, participated in competitive activities in numerous categories.

Other PBSC students who finished in the top 10 were: Alejandra Solano, who placed fourth in Business Communication; Joshua Deese took fourth in Impromptu Speaking; Shelia Ducram was fifth in the Job Interview category; and Karen Lee finished fifth in Hospitality Management.

“Winning first place was a rewarding moment for me,” said Stephenson, who graduated last fall from PBSC with a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in Information Management with a concentration in Security & Network Assurance.  “I started working at PBSC as part of the integrated technology service desk team as a student. My knowledge and experiences gained while working and going to school at PBSC factored 100 percent into winning this event.”

Adrian Stephenson

Stephenson is currently the Phi Beta Lambda president and a PBSC client services manager. He is also studying to obtain a Master of Business Administration in Information Technology Management from Western Governors University. He hopes to one day become a chief information officer, vice president or president.

Stephenson, along with DeVito and St. Fleur, will travel to San Antonio June 24-27 to compete in the national competition.

“To win second place was a feeling like no other,” said DeVito, who is the vice president of Phi Beta Lambda and plans to graduate with his Associate in Arts degree this summer. “It felt like things had come full circle, but it also is just a great feeling when all the hard work you’ve put in all year pays off in helping you achieve your goal.”

DeVito plans to major in history and minor in economics and then go to law school to achieve his dream of becoming a judge advocate general in the U.S. Coast Guard.

St. Fleur currently works as a scheduling specialist for Palm Tran. Her future goals are to get a master’s degree in project management, land a higher position at Palm Tran, and give back more to the community.

“The excitement that I first felt when they called my name was tremendous,” said St. Fleur, who is seeking a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in Supervision and Management. “I did not expect to make it, but I am now very excited to go to nationals.”

Phi Beta Lambda is the collegiate division of Future Business Leaders of America. For more information, visit www.fbla-pbl.org.


SCORE Palm Beach’s “3rd Annual Small Business Summit, Secrets to Growing Your Business”

SCORE Palm Beach’s “3rd Annual Small Business Summit, Secrets to Growing Your Business”, with Chris Baldwin, Chairman, President & CEO, BJ’s Wholesale Club, as the keynote speaker will be held on April 11, 2019. This includes a continental breakfast. Read more to learn more information on the event.

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